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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
just lost re-election and the eight or so seats. on the other hand, he still has a very diverse caucus in terms of ideology and it's going to be very difficult. you'll notice in hiss comments he didn't say no to 37%. that said, if he agreed to 37% and he's basically bilateral talks with the president, who says the kwaux is going to approve that. he could end up with a lot of egg on his face if he agrees with the president on this, they go forward with the vote, and it doesn't pass. >> david, the office of management and budget, omb, asking government agencies to figure out what they would cut if we do go over this fiscal cliff. talking a trillion dollars in cuts over ten years. that would mean furloughs for some federal workers, slower hiring, outside contracting, the closer we get to the cliff, the more real it begins to seem. how does that then change the negotiations? >> well, i think it's all part of the political pressure the white house is trying to apply to the congressional republicans. we saw the same thing in '11 when we had the near government shutdown and the dispute over t
economy and those seeking work. i came out the day after the election to put revenues on the table, to take a step toward the president to try to resolve this. when is he going to take a step towards us? >> can you see some way that you could agree to tax rate increase and protect small businesses at the same time, maybe going with the 37%, or some middle ground? >> there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue that the president seeks on the table, but none of it is going to be possible. if the president insists on his position, insists on my way or the highway. that is not the way to get to an agreement that i think is important for the american people and very important for our economy. thanks. >> reporter: for more on the fiscal cliff let's bring in bob sue sack, managing editor of the hill. thanks for joining us. >> thanks for having me on. >> reporter: he says this is a slow walk for our economy to the edge of the fiscal cliff, and if the president doesn't like the republican's plan he has an obligation to send them one that can pass both houses of congress a
to make a decision who to put in. he made it clear he wasn't running for election when he was up in 2016. there were some rumblings he would leave early. some people do this when they announce they aren't running again. sets up a fantastic scenario for republicans. all the talk around tim scott. he's a congressman, a black republican, very conservative. what would it say that the state that once elected strom thurmond to the senate would potentially have the only black man in the senate and he just so happens is a republican. you would put potentially tim scott in the senate, have him elected to a full term conceivably. lindsey graham up for election in 2014 and a governor's race in south carolina in 2014. so the palmetto state would become ground zero in a year and a half politically setting up ahead of the 2016 presidential cycle. in a sense, this is a great idea. put in a new young star, put him in place, make him as conservative as jim demint. let him go to the heritage foundation and run a think tank, graham gets saved. in a lot of ways people makes a lot of sense. >> ed, you do kno
at that time. the republicans held a lot of the cards. this time it's very different. president came off the re-election. that's why you see the president holding the hard line. a lot of pressure on the president to hold his hard line even from his left. i think you'll continue to seat president do so. it's going to be up to the republicans to feel whether he has enough pressure, i think the white house is encouraged that some republicans have broken ranks and are starting to say let's look at other opportunities to maybe raise rates. >> we'll talk about the ultimate in breaking ranks if you will. molly, i want to ask you about the surprising resignation of tea party favorite jim demint. it seems kind of sudden. why now? >> everybody was surprised about this. but i seems in the aftermath of the election the republicans are still in the minority of the senate. demint was in the minority of the minority. that's not a very powerful place to be. demint always known as a bomb thrower, someone who liked to make trouble. he figured he's probably correct about this he could have more power and influence and be
elections taking place in japan on the 16th and south korea on the 19th of this month. well within the range of this test that is scheduled to come in the coming days. influencing their neighbors and influencing politics and testing new ground with what would a second-term approach be with obama. bill: this is what we believe to be the ultimate range. 5,000 to 6,000 kilometers. 3,700 miles. china to the west here. in japan well within range of north korea were to be successful in developing this launch mechanism. here is hawaii. that's outside the range of the 6,000 kilometers. the question then begs how realistic is it that north korea would be a threat to the united states? >> through pro live raig they could be a threat to the united states. and if they were to hit our allies in the near range. in the south and also japan. those are the near-term risks. but proliferation could occur at any time. they were able to reach to hawaii ... bill: history shows they are not very good at this. are they getting better? >> only more tests will tell. you are correct history has shown it's been embarra
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)